Daddy’s Girl

My father gave me the greatest gift anyone could give another person: he believed in me. Jim Valvano

Dad and me Medora

I was always a daddy’s girl. My dad was one of those rare fathers nearly half a century ago (wow, am I really THAT old?) who always had time for me. For Dad, taking me along on the tractor, to the elevator, to haul pigs to market was never a burden. He always made me feel special!

But he didn’t spoil me. Respect for others and consideration for how I would feel if I was in another’s shoes was paramount. As was tolerance. I didn’t have to agree with how another felt or acted, but I needed to be considerate of their feelings and respect their opinions.

And my Dad was generous to the nth degree. If another soul was in need, he would take the shirt off his back (or give them Mom’s grocery money!) to help them get through a tight spot. He always felt that even when the cash was short, he had more than so many others: faith in God, a healthy, loving family, and there was always food on the table. He never knew the phrase “paying it forward” but that was how he lived.

Mostly, he loved my brother and me with unconditional love and encouraged both of us endlessly. I always knew that if I felt that the world was falling apart at the seams, he could help me find a way to put it back together (he wouldn’t do if for me though!)

He believed in me!

Dad and me college graduation

I miss you, Dad!

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Everyday Circus and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Daddy’s Girl

  1. Jane owens says:

    Awesome tribute to your Dad. Ii am so blessed to still have mine. Jane

  2. David Dahle says:

    Nice tribute. I feel the same way about my Dad. Hard to believe it’s been four years already.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s